Vagina thrush and its symptoms

l

Emobileclinic Trending Topic

 

Vaginal thrush is a common infection caused by an overgrowth of Candida albicans yeast. It is mostly harmless, about 75 per cent of women will have vaginal thrush in their lifetime. It is an infection generally caused by fungal yeast which commonly lives on the skin and around the vaginal area. The yeast survives in areas that are warm, moist, airless parts of the body. Other areas of the body that are prone to candidal infection include the groin, the mouth, and the nappy area in babies.

Symptoms of vaginal thrush
Sometimes symptoms are minor and clear up on their own. Often symptoms can be quite irritating and will not go without treatment. However, thrush does not damage the vagina, and it does not spread to damage the womb (uterus). If you are pregnant, thrush will not harm your baby. Here are common symptoms:
Vaginal discomfort such as itching or burning sensation A thick, white discharge and yeasty smell Redness or swelling of the vagina or vulva Stinging or burning while urinating or during sex Splits in the genital skin Vulnerable group More than half of all women will have at least one bout of thrush in their lives. In most cases it develops for no apparent reason.

However, certain factors can make thrush more likely to develop. The vagina contains mucus and some harmless germs (bacteria) which help to defend the vagina from candidal infection (and other germs). These natural defences may be altered or upset by certain situations – for example, when you are pregnant, if you have diabetes or if you take antibiotic medication. So, in these situations, you may be more likely to develop thrush.

People with a poor immune system are also more likely to develop thrush – for example, people on chemotherapy for certain cancers, people taking high-dose steroids, etc.
Some women develop repeated (recurrent) thrush. Recurrent thrush is defined as a bout of thrush four or more times in a year. Of women who develop a first bout of vaginal thrush, about 5 in 100 of them will get problems with recurrent vaginal thrush. In most cases, the reason why this occurs is not known. Some women just seem more prone than usual to develop thrush.

However, women with uncontrolled diabetes and women with a poor immune system may be more likely to develop recurrent thrush.
Diagnosis Tests are mostly not required to diagnose thrush. The diagnosis is often based on the typical symptoms and signs. However, it is important that you do not assume that a vaginal discharge is thrush because there are other causes of vaginal discharge.

If you have never had thrush before, you need to see a doctor or nurse to confirm the diagnosis and for advice on treatment. The doctor or nurse may examine you. No tests may be necessary if the symptoms and signs are typical.
However, the doctor or nurse may take small samples of the discharge with swabs if the cause of the discharge is not clear. The swabs will be taken to the laboratory to confirm the cause of the discharge.

If you have had thrush in the past and the same symptoms return (recur) then it is common practice to treat it without further examination or tests. If symptoms are not typical or the same as you usually have, or if you are having recurring symptoms, your doctor or nurse may examine you and take some swabs to confirm the cause.
Also, the doctor or nurse may check a urine sample if you have recurring thrush, to rule out diabetes.develop thrush. However, women with uncontrolled diabetes and women with a poor immune system may be more likely to develop recurrent thrush.

Diagnosis
Tests are mostly not required to diagnose thrush. The diagnosis is often based on the typical symptoms and signs. However, it is important that you do not assume that a vaginal discharge is thrush because there are other causes of vaginal discharge.
If you have never had thrush before, you need to see a doctor or nurse to confirm the diagnosis and for advice on treatment. The doctor or nurse may examine you. No tests may be necessary if the symptoms and signs are typical.
However, the doctor or nurse may take small samples of the discharge with swabs if the cause of the discharge is not clear. The swabs will be taken to the laboratory to confirm the cause of the discharge.

If you have had thrush in the past and the same symptoms return (recur) then it is common practice to treat it without further examination or tests. If symptoms are not typical or the same as you usually have, or if you are having recurring symptoms, your doctor or nurse may examine you and take some swabs to confirm the cause.
Also, the doctor or nurse may check a urine sample if you have recurring thrush, to rule out diabetes.



Leave a Reply