The risk of breast cancer reduced with these lifestyles

Emobileclinic Researchers’ corner

Breast cancer risk can be reduced by avoiding drinking, smoking, maintaining a healthy BMI and avoiding hormonal therapy after menopause. According to a professor of biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore , the risk of having breast cancer can be reduced by 30% if women maintain these healthy life styles. His study observed a cut down on breast cancers even among women with various breast cancer gene.

His study drew much controversy as healthy lifestyles seem to have upper edge on breast cancer.
“Those genetic risks are not set in stone,” Lifestyle factors may be even more important for women at higher genetic risk than for those at low genetic risk,” said senior researcher Nilanjan Chatterjee, a professor at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore.

About 92 various gene were reported to be influenced by healthy life style,BRCA mutilation was however excluded from his research. He hopes that in nearest future,more women would have access to BRCA investigation. The researchers observed about 40,000 women and two risk factors that remained constant in the study of these women were the period of time  they started their menstruation and family history of breast cancer. The risk of breast cancer was high among women with these risk factors.

Dupont, a professor at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tenn says “the bottom line is, this study provides evidence that, on a population level, a certain number of breast cancer cases would be prevented if women did these things.” He however said caution should be taken on the no hormone therapy after menopause.” I don’t think women should take this to mean that they have to go ‘cold turkey’ after menopause,” he said.

This revealed that even at 10% increase risks of breast cancer, these four lifestyles influenced it.“The bottom line is, this study provides evidence that, on a population level, a certain number of breast cancer cases would be prevented if women did these everyone.

The research was however limited to white women but the researchers believed that the same result will be obtained among the blacks. He encouraged more researches to be done in this regard.

SOURCES

Nilanjan Chatterjee, Ph.D., professor, biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore; May 26, 2016,JAMA Oncology, online



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