Previous Hot Post: ‘Pregnancies are still achievable with abnormal semen parameters’

A recent study with the objective to identify the percentage and outcomes of pregnancies achieved via IVF/ICSI from abnormal semen parameters gives the following details:



METHODOLOGY
The study was carried out between January 2014 and October 2015 at one of the  IVF hospital in Lagos.

 BACKGROUND TO THE STUDY
Globally, male factor has been recognised as an increasing and important cause of infertility. Various pharmacological and surgical treatment modalities have been described with little or no improvement in fertility outcome. In vitro fertilization/ intracytoplasmic sperm injection/ intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection (IVF/ICSI/IMSI), however, has improved treatment and fertility outcome for males with abnormal semen parameters.

 RESULTS



There were eighty-seven (87) pregnancies following IVF/ICSI during the study period. Fifty-six (56) of these pregnancies (64.4%) were products of abnormal semen parameters. The pregnancy outcomes from the different semen parameters were as follows:
Oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (20.7%),
Oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (20.7%),
teratozoospermia (19.5%),
oligoteratozoospermia (14.9%),
asthenozoospermia (2.3%),
obstructive azoospermia (2.3%),
asthenoteratozoospermia (2.3%),
oligozoospermia (1.2%) and oligoasthenozoospermia (1.2%).

OBSERVATION
Miscarriages were observed in fourteen (14) of the pregnancies achieved from abnormal semen parameters giving a miscarriage rate of 25%. Congenital abnormality was noted in two (2) of these pregnancies giving a prevalence of 3.6%. There have been twenty-two deliveries giving a delivery rate of 39.3% and twenty (35.7%) on-going pregnancies.

CONCLUSION

Pregnancies are still achievable with abnormal semen parameters. This is possible with the use of IVF/ICSI. Practitioners are encourage to avail their patients the knowledge and opportunity of IVF/ICSI in the treatment of male factor infertility and invariably assist in eliminating the cultural and social stigma experienced by infertile couples in our society.






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